indie iOS developer toolkit

Where do I start?

We’re frequently asked by fledgling developers, “where do I start?” and “what do I need?”. It’s a tough question to answer given everyone has different learning preference. That being said, we have come to realize that we send a pretty standard response. Whether our clients are interested in taking the plunge, our friends are curious about the inner workings of mobile software design, or the casual Reddit user asks for insight, we’ve found ourselves giving a similar response.

Well, okay then. What’s that response?

We’ll cut right to the chase. Our go-to list covers our favorite resources for the new indie (and cash-strapped) developer. We’ve personally used these tools and have grown so fond of them, that we still use a lot of them (in lieu of commercial grade software).

Our List

  • Learning Swift (or any other language, for that matter)iOS 13 & Swift 5 – The Complete iOS App Development Bootcamp by App Brewery on Udemy. We speak about this in our write-up on the perfect time to learn a new skill.
  • GitHub – This one is obvious, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention it. Get source control! While Xcode has a local repository, remote source control is imperative.
  • 2D graphics – We really like pixel art. It’s quick, easy to pick-up, and lightweight. We’d recommend starting your 2D graphics journey with one of the numerous apps on the App Store of your choice. We’ve had good experience with Pixel Studio.
  • 3D graphics – Just as we recommended pixel art for beginning graphics design, we’d recommend voxel art for 3D resources. Check out Magica Voxel to get started!
  • Text editors(-ish) – Thought we’d mention that we’re big fans of Atom for editing most text files (excluding Swift files). We also leverage PLIST Editor for working with property lists.
  • App Icon Generator – A nifty tool to convert your app icon to the required sizes.
  • GarageBand – The stock Apple app is perfect for creating your own loops and one-shot sounds. While it takes some time to master, you’ll be amazed by what you can generate quickly.
  • Splice.com – In the event you’re not interested in learning a new (virtual) instrument. Splice has you covered. The 100% royalty-free for commercial use audio is great for DJs and app developers alike.

That’s not enough!

While having the right toolset certainly makes the job easier. You can’t accomplish much without a community. Be sure to find other like-minded folks who share your passion for development and design. Reddit is perfect for this. Indie Hackers is great too.

Similarly, marketing is everything! Don’t neglect graphic design. While advertising is out of scope for this article (stay tuned!), it can be incredibly helpful in sparking interest and getting your brand out there.

Finally, remember to pay it forward. Once you get going, you’ll pick it up quickly and will then share in the efforts to educate the newcomers.

What’re your favorite tools? We’re always eager to try out new things.

graphic design for the new indie developer

Image by Lukas Bieri from Pixabay

Coding is the easy part

If we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that coding most software is much easier than the more creative aspects. How many of us seem to effortlessly implement new features, but neglect the user interface and interaction? We’ve definitely fallen into that trap. Even more, as programmers, we tend to devote a disproportionate amount of time to writing code, testing, and fixing bugs than we do to streamlining the interface and creating graphics.

We’d argue that in many cases, taking the time to draft out the user interface and design can eliminate many of the tedious coding tasks that we find ourselves in. We can even do away with the late-night hours developing a complicated feature that wouldn’t even be necessary with intuitive and beautiful design.

It’s hard to be creative

We’ll be the first to admit that we’ll find ourselves neglecting graphic design. In fact, many of our clients are interested more in implementing their grand functional vision (especially when it comes to internal, enterprise applications).

It’s funny because all we hear is the now, almost old adage “marketing is everything”, however, we tend to totally throw it out the window when it comes to execution. We totally get it though. In our case, when we first started out, we were only technically savvy. We didn’t even know how to design graphics for our games and our interfaces. It’s an intimidating task.

Getting started with design

Our recommendation to the indie developer (more specifically, the indie game developer), is to dip your toes into pixel art. It’s a friendly introduction to graphic design and it goes a long way to making your applications look polished.

Backgrounds, buttons, and even animations are incredibly easy to whip up in no time. We’ve always been intimidated by the professional graphic design software. The cost and the learning curve is high (and subjective). But like most other skills, devoting the time (and building habits) will reap rewards (e.g. more app downloads!).

Take a break from coding and start designing

To wrap up, after finishing this article (and sharing it!), jump on the App Store of your choice and download one of the pixel art apps. Stop neglecting what you’ve put aside for tomorrow and start designing basic graphics. Even the most simple design will improve the look, feel, and ease of use.

We’ve used Pixel Studio on iOS extensively. And while it’s notoriously clunky, the results are excellent. Anyway, we’ll let you get to it!

If you like this article, please comment below! Any and all feedback is greatly appreciate. Stay tuned for another simple (no-BS) write-up on app wire-framing and UX design!